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Affinity Photo Editor for iPad

ImageArt

MobiLifer
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Ann
Device
iPhone 7 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Getting tired are we? Yes, it’s the instant gratification era. Nobody wants to put any effort into anything but expects great results. I want to be a virtuoso violin player in 5 minutes. And then I want to be famous and rich. It’s my right.

Messing around for hours with Photoshop is what people used to do in the old days. Now it’s just button tapping. Without even knowing what happens when the button is tapped. Keep tapping and tapping and maybe magic will happen, or not.

It’s just the same in the DSLR world. Everyone wants great photos with no effort. All I need is a better camera. I’ve met people who have spent $15,000+ on camera gear, because they dream of making great photos, but they don’t have the first clue how to operate the camera. The search for the magic instant masterpiece filter. People will buy every filter, every LUT, expecting it to make gold out of mud. Even when they know deep down there is no free lunch, they keep trying.

Ah, for the good old days of film. After you pressed the shutter there was nothing more you could do except wait for your prints or slides to be developed. What you shot is what you got. (Actually, there’s an app like that)

Wait, that’s the answer. Let’s abandon trying to make good photographs, that’s too time consuming anyhow, and make snapshots instead. Just like film. Press the shutter and you get whatever you get. Oh, look, another picture of my feet.

Oh, forget that. It’s too much work. Let’s sit cross legged, no that sounds too much like structure, let’s just slouch on the floor and contemplate the great non doing.

It’s fun to take these flights of fancy now and then.
For me, I’m 60 now, I don’t have the energy or the motivation to put into something new. When I first started golf at 35, I put in all hours to get good and worked hard at it. When I came back from Hong Kong and struggled with my golf I didn’t have that motivation. It’s like my poor sister who would like to move to the UK but she says ‘Ann, I can’t start from scratch anymore, I’ve done it too many times, I just want to retire and start having a simpler life’. That’s where I’m coming from.

Yes, 60 is young these days but if you have put in long hours all your life like I did and just about burnt yourself out, there’s a lot of joy in just making something a hobby and saying, ‘ah to heck with it, I’m just going to read a book’. It’s not about instant gratification!
 

FundyBrian

MobiStaff
Site Staff
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Brian Townsend
Device
iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
For me, I’m 60 now, I don’t have the energy or the motivation to put into something new. When I first started golf at 35, I put in all hours to get good and worked hard at it. When I came back from Hong Kong and struggled with my golf I didn’t have that motivation. It’s like my poor sister who would like to move to the UK but she says ‘Ann, I can’t start from scratch anymore, I’ve done it too many times, I just want to retire and start having a simpler life’. That’s where I’m coming from.

Yes, 60 is young these days but if you have put in long hours all your life like I did and just about burnt yourself out, there’s a lot of joy in just making something a hobby and saying, ‘ah to heck with it, I’m just going to read a book’. It’s not about instant gratification!
Wow. That’s interesting to hear your perspective. I feel I have hundreds of things I still want to work on - photographically, more work I want to do on the house, more places to go kayaking, more mountain biking, starting this new flute making enterprise was a big step, getting geared up and rearranging my workshop. I want to make more types of flutes and maybe some other woodworking projects and do some welded metal sculpture, more things I would like to share through my photographic workshops, I want to get good at playing the Native American Flute although I’m starting a bit late in life to ever be an expert, I’m interested in making more connections in the NB First Nations community, etc, etc.
I’ll be 70 next year and I’m more conscious that my time is running out for some of the active things I enjoy doing so I’m trying to make the most of the time I have left. Once I can no longer get about easily then will be the time to sit back and take it easy. As soon as you sit down, you’re done. I find it takes 3 times as much work as it used to just to stay in the shape I’m in. Lugging all my firewood is getting to be more work each year. Doing my own car repairs is a bit more tiring than it used to be. At the end of the day I fall asleep in about 3 or 4 minutes. I can’t possibly do all the things I would like to accomplish. Each day it seems everything took longer than I expected to accomplish but there’s satisfaction in every step. I get tremendous enjoyment in looking as green stuff growing. Every tree, every bush, every blade of grass, every wildflower, seems pulsing with life and every one is unique. Every bird, every animal (deer, moose, raccoons, rabbits, foxes, etc) that visit the yard are always cause for delight. I just love all of it. It’s endlessly fascinating. And a home grown tomato is hard to beat. There are simply not enough hours in the day to take it all in. So then I enjoy my chamomile tea and Breton crackers and if I’m not too sleepy I can watch a couple of short YouTubes on my iPad before bed. But there’s definitely no time for TV.
One thing I notice is different. I have let go of the need to take pictures of everything that looks interesting. I no longer feel the need to photograph every different type of wildflower. I just let it go and instead I spend more time just enjoying the process of looking.

Maybe you’re just suffering from temporary burnout and once you get your energy levels up again you’ll be ready to go again. Time’s-a-wasting.

It is exactly the “something new” that gives me the jolt of energy to keep learning something new. I’m more comfortable now with letting go of things.

I was too ready to let go of my darkroom when the time came. No more chemicals and smells and hazardous waste, no more working for hours in the dark.

I never in a million years thought I would let go of my old Mini but once it was gone I realized what a weight it was to carry along, especially since I don’t have a suitable shop to work on it.

I’ve also let go of old ideas and picked up new ones that are invigorating.

Every single day I’m excited by the new day and whatever it is I’ll be doing next.

One thing is really important. Don’t spend time watching other people do things. A poor round of golf is still better than watching experts play on TV. A casual drive in the country is much better than watching World Cup car racing on TV. Photographers can easily become watchers. A pleasant hike in the woods is much better than watching athletes on some epic marathon adventure. A bit of amateur music making on the porch with friends is much more satisfying than watching some famous rock stars in concert. Be the participant and not the spectator.
 
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RoseCat

MobiStaff
Site Staff
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Catherine
Device
iPhone 7 Plus
A bit of amateur music making on the porch with friends is much more satisfying than watching some famous rock stars in concert.
Wellllll.... that is unless it’s a live P!nk concert and your dear friend is one of her backup singers. :whistle: Just sayin’. :feet:
 

ImageArt

MobiLifer
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Ann
Device
iPhone 7 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Wow. That’s interesting to hear your perspective. I feel I have hundreds of things I still want to work on - photographically, more work I want to do on the house, more places to go kayaking, more mountain biking, starting this new flute making enterprise was a big step, getting geared up and rearranging my workshop. I want to make more types of flutes and maybe some other woodworking projects and do some welded metal sculpture, more things I would like to share through my photographic workshops, I want to get good at playing the Native American Flute although I’m starting a bit late in life to ever be an expert, I’m interested in making more connections in the NB First Nations community, etc, etc.
I’ll be 70 next year and I’m more conscious that my time is running out for some of the active things I enjoy doing so I’m trying to make the most of the time I have left. Once I can no longer get about easily then will be the time to sit back and take it easy. As soon as you sit down, you’re done. I find it takes 3 times as much work as it used to just to stay in the shape I’m in. Lugging all my firewood is getting to be more work each year. Doing my own car repairs is a bit more tiring than it used to be. At the end of the day I fall asleep in about 3 or 4 minutes. I can’t possibly do all the things I would like to accomplish. Each day it seems everything took longer than I expected to accomplish but there’s satisfaction in every step. I get tremendous enjoyment in looking as green stuff growing. Every tree, every bush, every blade of grass, every wildflower, seems pulsing with life and every one is unique. Every bird, every animal (deer, moose, raccoons, rabbits, foxes, etc) that visit the yard are always cause for delight. I just love all of it. It’s endlessly fascinating. And a home grown tomato is hard to beat. There are simply not enough hours in the day to take it all in. So then I enjoy my chamomile tea and Breton crackers and if I’m not too sleepy I can watch a couple of short YouTubes on my iPad before bed. But there’s definitely no time for TV.
One thing I notice is different. I have let go of the need to take pictures of everything that looks interesting. I no longer feel the need to photograph every different type of wildflower. I just let it go and instead I spend more time just enjoying the process of looking.

Maybe you’re just suffering from temporary burnout and once you get your energy levels up again you’ll be ready to go again. Time’s-a-wasting.

It is exactly the “something new” that gives me the jolt of energy to keep learning something new. I’m more comfortable now with letting go of things.

I was too ready to let go of my darkroom when the time came. No more chemicals and smells and hazardous waste, no more working for hours in the dark.

I never in a million years thought I would let go of my old Mini but once it was gone I realized what a weight it was to carry along, especially since I don’t have a suitable shop to work on it.

I’ve also let go of old ideas and picked up new ones that are invigorating.

Every single day I’m excited by the new day and whatever it is I’ll be doing next.

One thing is really important. Don’t spend time watching other people do things. A poor round of golf is still better than watching experts play on TV. A casual drive in the country is much better than watching World Cup car racing on TV. Photographers can easily become watchers. A pleasant hike in the woods is much better than watching athletes on some epic marathon adventure. A bit of amateur music making on the porch with friends is much more satisfying than watching some famous rock stars in concert. Be the participant and not the spectator.
I don’t think my health is as good as yours, Brian. You are very lucky. I had a lot more energy in Hong Kong which is why I loved living there so much. I think I am affected by something here, all the tree pollen perhaps - I’ve never been able to work it out. Surrey where I live is very forested. When you don’t have the energy a lot of the time, you have to let go of constantly wanting to achieve things and just go with the flow.
 

Starzee

MobiLurver
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Star Greathouse
Device
iPhone Xs Max
My 365
My MobiTog 365
For me, I’m 60 now, I don’t have the energy or the motivation to put into something new. When I first started golf at 35, I put in all hours to get good and worked hard at it. When I came back from Hong Kong and struggled with my golf I didn’t have that motivation. It’s like my poor sister who would like to move to the UK but she says ‘Ann, I can’t start from scratch anymore, I’ve done it too many times, I just want to retire and start having a simpler life’. That’s where I’m coming from.

Yes, 60 is young these days but if you have put in long hours all your life like I did and just about burnt yourself out, there’s a lot of joy in just making something a hobby and saying, ‘ah to heck with it, I’m just going to read a book’. It’s not about instant gratification!
I agree. I’m a couple of years older than you and my energy is waning. My exercise is slower but more enjoyable. I choose to work on the things that bring me pleasure and worry less about winning. I still have three more years to work, to get the insurance for life, but my job at this point is not stressful, and I have many holidays. I’m living to enjoy and smile, not to be an expert in everything. I guess my standards have changed.
 

FundyBrian

MobiStaff
Site Staff
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Brian Townsend
Device
iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Just as a matter of interest Brian, how would you define a snapshot?
The definition I have been using is one I found in a photographic magazine about 30 or so years ago.

“A snapshot is a picture made without much thought or application of technique.”

Another interpretation might be, a picture made to capture the moment, or document a scene, but without paying any attention to trying to get a good result.

You might also think of this as “what does a photographer or photo enthusiast do while making a picture that a neophyte does not do”.

Here’s something I witnessed at a friend’s house while we were all sitting around in the living room. His mother saw something she wanted to take a picture of, grabbed up the camera, but backwards, put her eye up to the flash instead of the viewfinder, and pressed the shutter. It was maybe an hour before she could see properly again.
Now that’s an extreme case of not thinking, in this case to check first that the camera was pointing the right way.

Probably more important is how I might interpret that definition:

Let’s first look at what is implied by “without much thought” while making a picture. To me this would probably mean not much thought with regard to composition, vantage point, framing, deciding whether a vertical or horizontal orientation is most appropriate, trying to catch the decisive moment, waiting for a good expression (when that is appropriate), trying to elicit a good expression (when appropriate), paying attention to background objects that might align in an unfortunate way with the subject, trying to get the horizon level, exercising creative expression.

For technique that might include not putting much or any effort into getting the picture in focus, where to place the point of focus, considering the necessary depth of field, evaluating whether some adjustment was required to get a good exposure, ensuring you won’t have image data go off-scale (blown out highlights), paying attention to lighting conditions, lighting quality, lighting direction, paying attention to the correct white balance, noticing if the current shutter speed will result in a blurry picture (if you want a sharp one). And if you want to consider overall image quality then using a tripod is pretty standard.

A couple of other useful definitions.

Pre-visuslizing the result. You have some idea of what you are trying to achieve and use your photographic experience to work towards that objective. You look at a scene and in your minds eye you see how you want it to look, not how it really looks.

“Seeing photographically” means you know by experience the difference between what you see and how the photographic process will actually render it (based on the current deficiencies in the processes), and take steps to try to overcome the weak points and make full use of the strong points.
 

FundyBrian

MobiStaff
Site Staff
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Brian Townsend
Device
iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Just as a matter of interest Brian, how would you define a snapshot?
Back in the film days, we (we being the camera club members) were mostly using fairly fine grain films like Kodachrome 64 and 25, or Fujichrome 50, or maybe a 100 ASA for landscape and nature close-ups.
In those days “real” photographers used medium format cameras with 120 roll film or 4x5 sheet film cameras. The regular folks were using the newfangled 35mm cameras that real photographers sneered at. (Today, “real” photographers use full frame DSLRs or mirrorless cameras and sneer at cell phone photographers). To avoid having your pictures look like a gravel-scape of coarse grain you used slow films to try to match the image quality of medium format cameras.

Those landscapes and nature close-ups generally required a lot of depth of field to be successful so smaller apertures like f11 or f16 were usually used.
If you remember the “Sunny 16” rule, 1/ASA at F16 gave you a good exposure on a sunny day. For ASA 25 film that meant 1/30 sec at f16. Or if it was overcast or you were in a darker place an even slower shutter speed. In those circumstances using a tripod was essential. Not using a tripod meant camera shake or inadequate depth of field in order to have a safe hand held shutter speed. Which meant your pictures never measured up to what they could have been.
In that context, anyone not using a tripod for their photography was considered a snapshooter.

So things have lightened up considerably. The cell phone uses a wide open aperture, generally around f1.8 which means the shutter speed is mostly 1/1000 or faster, so camera shake isn’t much of an issue anymore.

I still think a tripod is an essential piece of photo gear for regular photography, at least when you are trying for a good quality result, but not simply because of image quality.
True, it allows using ISO 20 in even low light conditions, which is very important if you use RAW and want to avoid the need for noise reduction.

The tripod expands the range of times you can use your camera without camera shake. But there are other reasons, too.
Your compositions tend to be more precise, horizons straighter, etc.

More importantly, the tripod slows you down. Once you have bothered to set the darn thing up you have slipped out of rushing-around mode and begun to take your time, you can focus on the details. A little more time to think and consider the situation. More options to try neutral density filters for slow shutter photos. Maybe some comparison shots trying different ideas. It boils down to commitment. Once you have gone to the trouble of bringing the tripod along and taken the time to set it up you are making a greater commitment to your work. It’s a different mindset worth exploring, even if only as an exercise in seeing what happens when you take more time to make your photos. The longer you stand in one place the more you notice of your surroundings. Sort of a zen thing.
 
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