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Mobi52 deepop’s Project 52 - 2019

deepop

No Mobi-limiter...
MobiSupporter
Real Name
David
Device
iPhone Xs
My 365
My MobiTog 365

deepop

No Mobi-limiter...
MobiSupporter
Real Name
David
Device
iPhone Xs
My 365
My MobiTog 365
These ice bells are amazing. I wonder what sort of conditions made them form like this.
My guess is that the river level is dropping. The overhanging ice/snow melts and either the water tension (or river ice) retards the flow so that the meltwater is pushed out concentrically and then refreezes. If the water level is slowly receding the bell diameter is larger.
After I wrote this I duck-duck-go'd icicle bell or ice bell and got lots of similar pictures but no explanation.
Here's how icicles form

" icicles form through a natural scientific process that requires certain weather conditions. First, you need a source of frozen precipitation, such as snow or ice. If you get a blanketof snow or ice on your roof, there's a decent chance you could see icicles form soon.

Next, you need a combination of below-freezing temperatures and some sunshine. The sunshineis necessary to meltsome of the snow or ice to form small water drips. As the water begins to drip off the edge of a surface, such as a roof, the below-freezing air temperature will cause the drops to freeze again, creating the baseof a new icicle.

If the process ended there, icicles might look like small, icy warts along your roofline. As you already know, though, icicles eventually take on a long, thin, cone-like shape. Why does that happen?

As the Sun continues to melt snow or ice on the roof, water continues to drip down the slowly-growing icicle. The thin sheet of water slides down the outside of the icicle and gets colder as it reaches the bottom. At the bottom of the icicle, it refreezes and adds to the length of the icicle.

This occurs because the below-freezing air that surrounds the icicle acts like an insulating blanket. Because heat energy rises, this insulating layer of air is thicker at the top, so the top of the icicle stays warmer. Dripping water thus continues to flow toward the bottom of the icicle, where the insulating layer is thinner and allows the drops of water to freeze again.

This thawing and refreezing cycle repeats as long as weather conditions allow, leading to the familiar icicle shape that features a wider basewith a long cone that becomes progressively thinner at the bottom. When the water flow that created the icicle stops, the icicle can still change shape. When temperatures are below freezing, some ice can change directly into water vapor, creating a smoother surface along the outside of the icicle."

Maybe there's some inversion of the insulating blanket to allow the wider shape at the bottom. Maybe the bells aren't formed from meltwater from above but use the water in the river somehow.
 
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