• MobiTog Mantra = "Taken with and processed on a Mobile Device" PLEASE NOTE: MobiTog Rule 4. will be applied to all MobiTog Challenges & Contests. Non-compliance may result in entries being disqualified - you've been notified! > For Terms & Rules Click Here <
  • Ynot consider a regular monthly Donation? It's now doable under the Donate tab! (A Donation of just £1/$1 per month will help cover our costs & assist with updates & improvements) HUGE THANKS to all our generous MobiSupporters!
  • NEW MEMBER NOTICE - Need assistance finding your way around Mobitog? > CLICK HERE FOR HELP SECTION <

Gimbse camera keeps things straight.

FundyBrian

MobiLifer
Mobi Veteran
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Brian Townsend
Device
iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Gimbse Camera by Christian Kappertz
https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/gimbse-camera/id1301205254?mt=8
$5.49 Cdn and no in app purchases.

Some time ago I wrote in a post that considering the various sensors in the iPhone it should be possible to make an auto perspective-correcting camera. Sort of auto-Scheimpflug. Well, the Gimbse camera app does all that and more. For a while we have had camera apps that always keep the horizon straight but that’s all they did.
Unless you have a particular interest in this you might find the price a bit steep, especially considering there is no way to try the app for free before buying.
As far as I can tell you only have jpeg as a file type choice. But the camera is reasonably capable, with zoom, exposure adjustment, white balance adjustment, and white balance lock, and support for wide and tele lenses. It also has a calibration routine to ensure you get the most accurate perspective corrections.
Here is a screen shot of the app screen.
1F297671-AE87-47FA-90B4-96FE3FE65E8A.png

The in-app help system is quite well planned. When you tap the “I” information icon just above the shutter button the help text pops up, and if you tap one of the other icons while the help is showing the specific info relating to that control is shown.
When you press one of the icons a green line appears below it so you know what controls are active.
In the screen shot above you can see the app has already identified the camera angle and drawn a frame to indicate the actual picture result.

You have probably all encountered the situation where the thing you want to photograph has a big glare or your own shadow on it at the angle you want to stand to make it straight. With Gimbse you can stand quite far off-axis and still get a straight picture.
8B34DDE7-6676-419A-A04E-EE0F4055E188.jpeg

I was fumbling the camera a bit while trying to make the screen shot so the framing here isn’t quite right. Note the different icons selected. You start out facing the wall properly then engage Gallery mode and the camera senses your change of position and keeps the frame matching your subject plane. Then you press the shutter and the picture comes out rectangular and straight. There is also a fine-tuning adjustment to make live adjustments if necessary.
I found it quite amazing how the camera sensed the subject angle in relation to the camera angle and straightened it out.
This will be great for all those situations where you want to make the picture straight. Architecture, interiors, trees in scenery, etc.
 

ImageArt

MobiLifer
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Ann
Device
iPhone 11 Pro
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Gimbse Camera by Christian Kappertz
https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/gimbse-camera/id1301205254?mt=8
$5.49 Cdn and no in app purchases.

Some time ago I wrote in a post that considering the various sensors in the iPhone it should be possible to make an auto perspective-correcting camera. Sort of auto-Scheimpflug. Well, the Gimbse camera app does all that and more. For a while we have had camera apps that always keep the horizon straight but that’s all they did.
Unless you have a particular interest in this you might find the price a bit steep, especially considering there is no way to try the app for free before buying.
As far as I can tell you only have jpeg as a file type choice. But the camera is reasonably capable, with zoom, exposure adjustment, white balance adjustment, and white balance lock, and support for wide and tele lenses. It also has a calibration routine to ensure you get the most accurate perspective corrections.
Here is a screen shot of the app screen.
View attachment 117625
The in-app help system is quite well planned. When you tap the “I” information icon just above the shutter button the help text pops up, and if you tap one of the other icons while the help is showing the specific info relating to that control is shown.
When you press one of the icons a green line appears below it so you know what controls are active.
In the screen shot above you can see the app has already identified the camera angle and drawn a frame to indicate the actual picture result.

You have probably all encountered the situation where the thing you want to photograph has a big glare or your own shadow on it at the angle you want to stand to make it straight. With Gimbse you can stand quite far off-axis and still get a straight picture.
View attachment 117626
I was fumbling the camera a bit while trying to make the screen shot so the framing here isn’t quite right. Note the different icons selected. You start out facing the wall properly then engage Gallery mode and the camera senses your change of position and keeps the frame matching your subject plane. Then you press the shutter and the picture comes out rectangular and straight. There is also a fine-tuning adjustment to make live adjustments if necessary.
I found it quite amazing how the camera sensed the subject angle in relation to the camera angle and straightened it out.
This will be great for all those situations where you want to make the picture straight. Architecture, interiors, trees in scenery, etc.
So would it do it with buildings too? What is the resolution?

One of the Enlight apps, Quikshot I think, straightens a picture if the horizon is squiff.
 

FundyBrian

MobiLifer
Mobi Veteran
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Brian Townsend
Device
iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
So would it do it with buildings too? What is the resolution?

One of the Enlight apps, Quikshot I think, straightens a picture if the horizon is squiff.
I have 2 or 3 other apps that keep the horizon straight. More useful with video. In fact, with the video one you can zoom in by twisting your camera deliberately crooked, which is much smoother than trying to operate a slider.
Yes, architecture for sure. That would be the most common use for most people I would think. But it works in any direction, or plane. Yesterday I noticed in a room that as I panned across the wall it continued to correct the shape as I panned and when I hit the next wall it jumped to the new orientation of the new wall. It must also interpret the lines in the scene to be able to do that.
Let’s suppose you were collecting texture or pattern material, like a cobblestone walkway, or some fancy inlaid stonework flooring, and you couldn’t stand right overhead but you didn’t want the pattern to get smaller at the far side. Maybe there was even a glare at one angle.
FDFF661E-EE69-45FA-9D59-32FBD86F4D7B.png

Here’s another screen shot. The Gimbse camera has determined the amount of perspective correction required for the angle I’m looking down at the floor and shown the corrected image space on the screen. Seeing the corrected image space allows me to fine tune my framing. The framing correction responds to every possible angle of your camera. Then I made the picture and checked the image resolution - 4032 x 3024 px.

There is some limit to how far you can tilt the camera before it jumps to the next plane so I don’t think you can tip your camera up at 60° and expect a parallel shot. But the range it pretty good.
I haven’t tried it with add-on lenses yet. I’m wondering if it is only calibrated to the built-in standard and tele lenses.
I was just trying my Moment wide angle lens. The rate of perspective correction required is a bit different than the standard lens but it still helps a lot. There is another correction slider I have not explored enough yet so this may help with the wide angle.

Identifying the icons left to right:
Top row L>R: Horizon Mode, Architecture Mode, Zoom, Exposure Compensation, Manual Focus, Spot Autofocus, Spot White Balance. Incidentally, the focus and white balance spots “stick" to where you set them on the image even if you move your framing afterwards so it continues to track as you move.
Middle Row L>R: Easel Mode, Gallery Mode, Rotation, Info, Colour Balance, Exposure & White Balance Lock, Colour/B&W Image Mode Switch.
Bottom row L>R:Live Perspective Correction, Global Reference Lines, Shutter button, Wide/Tele Lens Switch, Front/Rear Camera Switch, Image space- this is where your image appears after you have made it allowing you to jump to it in the camera roll.
 

JillyG

MobiLifer
Mobi Veteran
Real Name
Jilly
Device
iPhone 11 Pro Max
My 365
My MobiTog 365
I have 2 or 3 other apps that keep the horizon straight. More useful with video. In fact, with the video one you can zoom in by twisting your camera deliberately crooked, which is much smoother than trying to operate a slider.
Yes, architecture for sure. That would be the most common use for most people I would think. But it works in any direction, or plane. Yesterday I noticed in a room that as I panned across the wall it continued to correct the shape as I panned and when I hit the next wall it jumped to the new orientation of the new wall. It must also interpret the lines in the scene to be able to do that.
Let’s suppose you were collecting texture or pattern material, like a cobblestone walkway, or some fancy inlaid stonework flooring, and you couldn’t stand right overhead but you didn’t want the pattern to get smaller at the far side. Maybe there was even a glare at one angle.
View attachment 117649
Here’s another screen shot. The Gimbse camera has determined the amount of perspective correction required for the angle I’m looking down at the floor and shown the corrected image space on the screen. Seeing the corrected image space allows me to fine tune my framing. The framing correction responds to every possible angle of your camera. Then I made the picture and checked the image resolution - 4032 x 3024 px.

There is some limit to how far you can tilt the camera before it jumps to the next plane so I don’t think you can tip your camera up at 60° and expect a parallel shot. But the range it pretty good.
I haven’t tried it with add-on lenses yet. I’m wondering if it is only calibrated to the built-in standard and tele lenses.
I was just trying my Moment wide angle lens. The rate of perspective correction required is a bit different than the standard lens but it still helps a lot. There is another correction slider I have not explored enough yet so this may help with the wide angle.

Identifying the icons left to right:
Top row L>R: Horizon Mode, Architecture Mode, Zoom, Exposure Compensation, Manual Focus, Spot Autofocus, Spot White Balance. Incidentally, the focus and white balance spots “stick" to where you set them on the image even if you move your framing afterwards so it continues to track as you move.
Middle Row L>R: Easel Mode, Gallery Mode, Rotation, Info, Colour Balance, Exposure & White Balance Lock, Colour/B&W Image Mode Switch.
Bottom row L>R:Live Perspective Correction, Global Reference Lines, Shutter button, Wide/Tele Lens Switch, Front/Rear Camera Switch, Image space- this is where your image appears after you have made it allowing you to jump to it in the camera roll.
I was tempted by it until I saw all of those icons on the side. Too many for me to bother with unfortunately. I can see that it would be very useful, but not for me.
 

FundyBrian

MobiLifer
Mobi Veteran
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Brian Townsend
Device
iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
I was tempted by it until I saw all of those icons on the side. Too many for me to bother with unfortunately. I can see that it would be very useful, but not for me.
Once you know what they all do it really is simple enough. Plus, and this is a big plus, there are no other complicated menus full of settings to sort out.
 

FundyBrian

MobiLifer
Mobi Veteran
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Brian Townsend
Device
iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
We’re so accustomed to the typical wide angle distortion with cell phones that many people don’t even notice it anymore.
AD5A97E4-A2B4-4211-B197-7B224944367E.jpeg

Here’s a photo I made this afternoon while out getting our Christmas tree at a U-cut lot. Look how much Fabi is leaning while the tree on the opposite side is leaning just as far the other way. This would have been a perfect occasion to use Gimbse but since it was just an ordinary snapshot it never occurred to me. But as soon as I looked at the picture I thought, that’s not suitable for posting. I had to fix it first with SKRWT. I wouldn’t have had to do that if I had used Gimbse.
 

Ryn S

MobiLurver
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Ryn S
Device
iPhone 7 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Gimbse Camera by Christian Kappertz
https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/gimbse-camera/id1301205254?mt=8
$5.49 Cdn and no in app purchases.

Some time ago I wrote in a post that considering the various sensors in the iPhone it should be possible to make an auto perspective-correcting camera. Sort of auto-Scheimpflug. Well, the Gimbse camera app does all that and more. For a while we have had camera apps that always keep the horizon straight but that’s all they did.
Unless you have a particular interest in this you might find the price a bit steep, especially considering there is no way to try the app for free before buying.
As far as I can tell you only have jpeg as a file type choice. But the camera is reasonably capable, with zoom, exposure adjustment, white balance adjustment, and white balance lock, and support for wide and tele lenses. It also has a calibration routine to ensure you get the most accurate perspective corrections.
Here is a screen shot of the app screen.
View attachment 117625
The in-app help system is quite well planned. When you tap the “I” information icon just above the shutter button the help text pops up, and if you tap one of the other icons while the help is showing the specific info relating to that control is shown.
When you press one of the icons a green line appears below it so you know what controls are active.
In the screen shot above you can see the app has already identified the camera angle and drawn a frame to indicate the actual picture result.

You have probably all encountered the situation where the thing you want to photograph has a big glare or your own shadow on it at the angle you want to stand to make it straight. With Gimbse you can stand quite far off-axis and still get a straight picture.
View attachment 117626
I was fumbling the camera a bit while trying to make the screen shot so the framing here isn’t quite right. Note the different icons selected. You start out facing the wall properly then engage Gallery mode and the camera senses your change of position and keeps the frame matching your subject plane. Then you press the shutter and the picture comes out rectangular and straight. There is also a fine-tuning adjustment to make live adjustments if necessary.
I found it quite amazing how the camera sensed the subject angle in relation to the camera angle and straightened it out.
This will be great for all those situations where you want to make the picture straight. Architecture, interiors, trees in scenery, etc.
Oh thank you! I just got it and I am impressed with how this app works!
 

Ryn S

MobiLurver
MobiSupporter
Real Name
Ryn S
Device
iPhone 7 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
I was tempted by it until I saw all of those icons on the side. Too many for me to bother with unfortunately. I can see that it would be very useful, but not for me.
Jilly, they look daunting but if you just set up the auto one once it still does what I need it to do...keep straight things straight :)
 
Last edited:

Gimbse

MobiStarter
Developer
Real Name
Christian Kappertz
Device
iPhone 11 Pro
Hi Brian,

I just wanted to say this is the best best and most detailed review I've ever read about Gimbse! There are so many features and possibilities that do not appear to be obvious for many users, you have found them all and described them so well!

Thank you very much for helping this new technology to be perceived,
Christian
 
Top