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Mobi52 Larry’s Project 52 - 2019

lisamjw

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Lisa Waddell
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iPhone 7 Plus
Monthly average for Jan was low of -20.6 and high average of -11 which is not really far off the long term averages. Of course there have been several days with -33’s and that doesn’t take into consideration the wind chill. January seemed to have more wind or higher wind speeds so several days felt closer to -50’s. Monthly average wind speed was 21.5kmh or about 14mph Had a couple days where wind was up over 60kmh (40mph) and that coupled with -30’s gets really cold, Humidy is also higher than normal for the month and again contributes, higher means you feel colder. Today the wind is lower so feels better today then it did yesterday.
This year I seem to be cold a lot, more than previous years. Beginning of January I changed my bedding, we had a mattress pad but took that off and put on one that is filled with goose down which holds heat better, regular fitted sheet over that, top sheet I replaced with a flannel sheet then a duvet that again is goose down and because I still felt cold threw a heavier fleece blanket on top and sleep pretty good. Have thought about trying one of the weighted blankets as they are supposed to help you sleep but will see.

Just looking online for the heavy flannel but most call them a mink blanket because they feel so soft :) they say they weigh around 4kg or 8-9lbs...
That sounds very warm and comfy!
 

Lzed

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Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
A couple days ago there was a train derailment out by Field BC, apparently the second one in just the past month. First happened up in the upper Spiral tunnel and nine empty grain cars derailed. That was the one in Jan and was cleaned up in a day or so. This one started in the lower spiral tunnel and the brakes let go. Big heavy train, one hundred and ten full grain cars, three engines one at the front, middle and end. Of all the cars and engines only 9 were still on the tracks. The location of the start is a normal stopping point and they had just stopped and new crew came on as the old crew was close to the maximum hours they are allowed to work.
This stretch of track has been an issue for a very long time as it is the longest steepest section through the mountains. Up until the 60’s they had to severely limit length of the trains because of the grades. They then decided to build both upper and lower spiral tunnels which are a tourist location and there are pull-offs off the highway so you can see them. Basically each tunnel makes about a 1 mile radius spiral and with the too of them meant the grades are not as steep as before.
In any case the three new people that got on the train (2 engineers and a trainee) were killed in the crash. When the brakes let go it became a runaway and they said that it was far exceeding the 30mph limit. Lead locomotive derailed at the bottom of the valley and went into the river falling cars just kept derailing at around the same point and what a mess. Main line will be shut for some time cleaning it up and to make things worst the place it derailed is down about 70’ below the highway so limited to where the can use equipment without shutting the trans Canada highway through there.

On another note/update
Last week the driver of the semi that hit the bus of hockey players plead guilty to all charges and spent close to a week listening to family members of the killed hockey players. Apparently the driver is not a Canadian citizen, he was a refugee from somewhere in the Middle East and had been given only a weeks training to drive a semi and had about 2 weeks driving, this truck was not his regular truck, much larger then what he was used to.
To tell the truth I can feel for the guy, and some comments made during this week bothered me a lot. Most of course were blaming him for being in the wrong but you have to remember where you are. The province has a grid road pretty much every mile and I doubt a lot of people, even those making the comment have never ever run the intersection or not come to a complete stop at every intersection. In an case a young inexperienced driver with next to no training and it in an unfamiliar truck is an accident waiting to happen.
Appently they have been going through the drivers log books and Sid there were in the six days prior to the crash som 51 federal violation and 13 Saskatchewan violations, most of those were time unaccounted for or some not even entered or entered wrong. Not sure when he will find out how long he will be in prison and the say in all likelihood when he is released from prison he will be deported back to his home country
 

Lzed

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Site Staff
Real Name
Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
Currently sitting at -33c, high today was only -30c and feels like -42, No end to the cold in sight.

my son can find some weird stuff and he found this...

This Was the Coldest Day in Canadian History

By Carman Scherlie, Our Canada (Readers Digest0

In 1947, the temperature in the Yukon plunged to a bone-chilling and record-breaking -81.4°F.

Feb. 3, 1947: The Coldest Day in Canada

My father, Wilfred Blezard, joined Transport Canada in 1946, a year after he arrived home from Europe, after serving six years in the Canadian Army. He willingly accepted postings as a weather technician to various northern stations in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, very grateful for the solitude and quietness of these lonely outposts, in sharp contrast to his devastating experiences overseas.

The first weather station my father was posted to was called Snag Airport, located approximately 30 kilometres east of the Alaska-Yukon border, near Beaver Creek, Yukon. He was one of four young weathermen stationed there during 1946-47. Snag Airport was part of the Northwest Staging Route of emergency landing strips and observation stations established during World War II to facilitate travel from Alaska and the Yukon to Central Canada and the United States.

The weather station operated from 1943 to 1966. It was while my father was there that the temperature plummeted to -81.4°F on February 3, 1947, a record-breaking low for all of North America. He, along with the officer in charge, Gord Toole, had the dubious honour of recording this unbelievable temperature. According to astronomy experts, on that day, Snag was colder than the average surface temperature of Mars. Telegrams of congratulations were received from many countries around the world, with several messages referring to Snag as North America’s new "cold pole."

Mark Twain once remarked, "Cold! If the thermometer had been an inch longer, we’d all have frozen to death."

My father and Gord Toole immediately noticed that the tiny sliding scale inside the glass thermometer column had fallen into the bulb at the end, well below the lowest reading on the thermometer (-80°F). After marking the thermometer sheath using a fine, sharp file (ink does not flow at that temperature), it was sent to a Toronto laboratory where it was re-calibrated at -81.4°F. Three months later, the weather service accepted this as the correct temperature, the lowest official temperature ever recorded in North America. According to my father, the men were excited by the news, saying, "We had to put a little lock on the door to the instrument screen because everyone was rushing out and looking at the thermometers. Even the slightest bit of body heat would cause the alcohol to jump." Now, all official alcohol thermometers in Canada have markings to -94°F, a thermometer redesign due to the coldest day in Canadian history.

Just how cold is -81.4°F? In order to give you a clear idea of the answer to this question, I have chosen to include several anecdotal, once-in-a- lifetime observations, as recorded by my father and Gord Toole in several interviews given over the years since this historic event. Will Snag remain North America’s "cold pole?" Only time will tell.



How Cold Was the Coldest Day in Canadian History?

- At -80°F, the people’s voices and barking dogs in the village of Snag could be plainly heard at the airport four miles away. Read on for more extreme facts from the coldest day in Canadian history:

- An aircraft that flew over Snag that day at 10,000 feet was first heard when still more than 20 miles away, and later, when overhead, still at 10,000 feet, the engine roar was deafening. It sounded like it was in your bedroom! It woke everyone who was sleeping at the time because they thought the airplane was landing at the airport.

- A piece of thin ice, when broken, sounded exactly like breaking glass.

- Ice on the White River, about a mile east of the airport, cracked and boomed loudly, like gunfire, amplified by a cap of warmer air lying over intensely cold air on the ground, bouncing sound waves across great distances.

- The extreme cold air generated intense radio static, much like the crackling sounds heard during a thunderstorm.

- Exhaled breath instantly froze with a hissing noise, and stayed suspended in the air at head level in long vapour streaks several hundred meters long, like miniature condensation trails from a jet aircraft. These patches of human "fog" remained in the still air for three to four minutes, before falling to the ground as powdery ice crystals. One observer found such a trail still marking his path when he returned along the same route 15 minutes later. Becoming lost was of no concern!

- For days, a small fog or steam patch would appear over the sled dogs, at a height of 15 to 20 feet. It would disappear only in the warm part of the day when the temperature warmed up to -60°F.

- A chunk of ice was so cold that, when brought into a warm room, it took five full minutes before there was any trace of moisture, even when held in a warm hand.

- A cupful of cold water was thrown high into the air, just to see what would happen. Before it hit the ground, it made a hissing noise, froze and fell as tiny round pellets of ice the size of wheat kernels. Spit also froze before hitting the ground.

- At such temperatures, metal snapped like ice, wood became petrified, even paper became brittle and rubber was just like cement. The sled dogs’ leather harnesses would break if bent.

- After seconds outdoors, nose hairs froze rigidly and your eyes would tear. Facial hair and glasses become thickly crusted with frozen breath. You had to be careful not to inhale too deeply for fear of freezing or scalding your lungs from the frigid air. The only other discomfort caused by the cold were numerous cases of beginning frostbite, particularly the familiar "ping" as the tip of one’s nose froze. "It was easy to freeze your nose at -70°F without even knowing it was cold."

- The animals didn’t appear to suffer too much during this two-week spell when the temperatures never climbed above -64°F. Two horses, owned by a local trapper, used to visit the cookhouse every morning. It was amazing the things they would eat: apple pie, wieners, buns and cakes, and as an extra treat the cook even fed them ice cream one morning at -76°F. During their wandering around outside, almost eight inches of ice would build up on their hooves, making it look like they were up on stilts.

- The stamina of the sled dogs was truly remarkable. They never bothered to go into their kennels, preferring instead to lay on top of their kennels, curled up with their heads tucked in towards their bellies. A band of frost fog formed over their heads, keeping them reasonably warm.

- Starting machinery was a chore. Getting an engine started was no guarantee it would continue to run. At that temperature, the oil and transmission fluid would coagulate into something approaching a solid.

- And finally, truck tires could splay open when they hit ruts in the road.
 

lisamjw

MobiStaff
Site Staff
Real Name
Lisa Waddell
Device
iPhone 7 Plus
Currently sitting at -33c, high today was only -30c and feels like -42, No end to the cold in sight.

my son can find some weird stuff and he found this...

This Was the Coldest Day in Canadian History

By Carman Scherlie, Our Canada (Readers Digest0

In 1947, the temperature in the Yukon plunged to a bone-chilling and record-breaking -81.4°F.

Feb. 3, 1947: The Coldest Day in Canada

My father, Wilfred Blezard, joined Transport Canada in 1946, a year after he arrived home from Europe, after serving six years in the Canadian Army. He willingly accepted postings as a weather technician to various northern stations in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, very grateful for the solitude and quietness of these lonely outposts, in sharp contrast to his devastating experiences overseas.

The first weather station my father was posted to was called Snag Airport, located approximately 30 kilometres east of the Alaska-Yukon border, near Beaver Creek, Yukon. He was one of four young weathermen stationed there during 1946-47. Snag Airport was part of the Northwest Staging Route of emergency landing strips and observation stations established during World War II to facilitate travel from Alaska and the Yukon to Central Canada and the United States.

The weather station operated from 1943 to 1966. It was while my father was there that the temperature plummeted to -81.4°F on February 3, 1947, a record-breaking low for all of North America. He, along with the officer in charge, Gord Toole, had the dubious honour of recording this unbelievable temperature. According to astronomy experts, on that day, Snag was colder than the average surface temperature of Mars. Telegrams of congratulations were received from many countries around the world, with several messages referring to Snag as North America’s new "cold pole."

Mark Twain once remarked, "Cold! If the thermometer had been an inch longer, we’d all have frozen to death."

My father and Gord Toole immediately noticed that the tiny sliding scale inside the glass thermometer column had fallen into the bulb at the end, well below the lowest reading on the thermometer (-80°F). After marking the thermometer sheath using a fine, sharp file (ink does not flow at that temperature), it was sent to a Toronto laboratory where it was re-calibrated at -81.4°F. Three months later, the weather service accepted this as the correct temperature, the lowest official temperature ever recorded in North America. According to my father, the men were excited by the news, saying, "We had to put a little lock on the door to the instrument screen because everyone was rushing out and looking at the thermometers. Even the slightest bit of body heat would cause the alcohol to jump." Now, all official alcohol thermometers in Canada have markings to -94°F, a thermometer redesign due to the coldest day in Canadian history.

Just how cold is -81.4°F? In order to give you a clear idea of the answer to this question, I have chosen to include several anecdotal, once-in-a- lifetime observations, as recorded by my father and Gord Toole in several interviews given over the years since this historic event. Will Snag remain North America’s "cold pole?" Only time will tell.



How Cold Was the Coldest Day in Canadian History?

- At -80°F, the people’s voices and barking dogs in the village of Snag could be plainly heard at the airport four miles away. Read on for more extreme facts from the coldest day in Canadian history:

- An aircraft that flew over Snag that day at 10,000 feet was first heard when still more than 20 miles away, and later, when overhead, still at 10,000 feet, the engine roar was deafening. It sounded like it was in your bedroom! It woke everyone who was sleeping at the time because they thought the airplane was landing at the airport.

- A piece of thin ice, when broken, sounded exactly like breaking glass.

- Ice on the White River, about a mile east of the airport, cracked and boomed loudly, like gunfire, amplified by a cap of warmer air lying over intensely cold air on the ground, bouncing sound waves across great distances.

- The extreme cold air generated intense radio static, much like the crackling sounds heard during a thunderstorm.

- Exhaled breath instantly froze with a hissing noise, and stayed suspended in the air at head level in long vapour streaks several hundred meters long, like miniature condensation trails from a jet aircraft. These patches of human "fog" remained in the still air for three to four minutes, before falling to the ground as powdery ice crystals. One observer found such a trail still marking his path when he returned along the same route 15 minutes later. Becoming lost was of no concern!

- For days, a small fog or steam patch would appear over the sled dogs, at a height of 15 to 20 feet. It would disappear only in the warm part of the day when the temperature warmed up to -60°F.

- A chunk of ice was so cold that, when brought into a warm room, it took five full minutes before there was any trace of moisture, even when held in a warm hand.

- A cupful of cold water was thrown high into the air, just to see what would happen. Before it hit the ground, it made a hissing noise, froze and fell as tiny round pellets of ice the size of wheat kernels. Spit also froze before hitting the ground.

- At such temperatures, metal snapped like ice, wood became petrified, even paper became brittle and rubber was just like cement. The sled dogs’ leather harnesses would break if bent.

- After seconds outdoors, nose hairs froze rigidly and your eyes would tear. Facial hair and glasses become thickly crusted with frozen breath. You had to be careful not to inhale too deeply for fear of freezing or scalding your lungs from the frigid air. The only other discomfort caused by the cold were numerous cases of beginning frostbite, particularly the familiar "ping" as the tip of one’s nose froze. "It was easy to freeze your nose at -70°F without even knowing it was cold."

- The animals didn’t appear to suffer too much during this two-week spell when the temperatures never climbed above -64°F. Two horses, owned by a local trapper, used to visit the cookhouse every morning. It was amazing the things they would eat: apple pie, wieners, buns and cakes, and as an extra treat the cook even fed them ice cream one morning at -76°F. During their wandering around outside, almost eight inches of ice would build up on their hooves, making it look like they were up on stilts.

- The stamina of the sled dogs was truly remarkable. They never bothered to go into their kennels, preferring instead to lay on top of their kennels, curled up with their heads tucked in towards their bellies. A band of frost fog formed over their heads, keeping them reasonably warm.

- Starting machinery was a chore. Getting an engine started was no guarantee it would continue to run. At that temperature, the oil and transmission fluid would coagulate into something approaching a solid.

- And finally, truck tires could splay open when they hit ruts in the road.
I can’t even imagine it being that cold!!:eek::eek:
 

Starzee

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MobiSupporter
Real Name
Star Greathouse
Device
iPhone X
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Currently sitting at -33c, high today was only -30c and feels like -42, No end to the cold in sight.

my son can find some weird stuff and he found this...

This Was the Coldest Day in Canadian History

By Carman Scherlie, Our Canada (Readers Digest0

In 1947, the temperature in the Yukon plunged to a bone-chilling and record-breaking -81.4°F.

Feb. 3, 1947: The Coldest Day in Canada

My father, Wilfred Blezard, joined Transport Canada in 1946, a year after he arrived home from Europe, after serving six years in the Canadian Army. He willingly accepted postings as a weather technician to various northern stations in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, very grateful for the solitude and quietness of these lonely outposts, in sharp contrast to his devastating experiences overseas.

The first weather station my father was posted to was called Snag Airport, located approximately 30 kilometres east of the Alaska-Yukon border, near Beaver Creek, Yukon. He was one of four young weathermen stationed there during 1946-47. Snag Airport was part of the Northwest Staging Route of emergency landing strips and observation stations established during World War II to facilitate travel from Alaska and the Yukon to Central Canada and the United States.

The weather station operated from 1943 to 1966. It was while my father was there that the temperature plummeted to -81.4°F on February 3, 1947, a record-breaking low for all of North America. He, along with the officer in charge, Gord Toole, had the dubious honour of recording this unbelievable temperature. According to astronomy experts, on that day, Snag was colder than the average surface temperature of Mars. Telegrams of congratulations were received from many countries around the world, with several messages referring to Snag as North America’s new "cold pole."

Mark Twain once remarked, "Cold! If the thermometer had been an inch longer, we’d all have frozen to death."

My father and Gord Toole immediately noticed that the tiny sliding scale inside the glass thermometer column had fallen into the bulb at the end, well below the lowest reading on the thermometer (-80°F). After marking the thermometer sheath using a fine, sharp file (ink does not flow at that temperature), it was sent to a Toronto laboratory where it was re-calibrated at -81.4°F. Three months later, the weather service accepted this as the correct temperature, the lowest official temperature ever recorded in North America. According to my father, the men were excited by the news, saying, "We had to put a little lock on the door to the instrument screen because everyone was rushing out and looking at the thermometers. Even the slightest bit of body heat would cause the alcohol to jump." Now, all official alcohol thermometers in Canada have markings to -94°F, a thermometer redesign due to the coldest day in Canadian history.

Just how cold is -81.4°F? In order to give you a clear idea of the answer to this question, I have chosen to include several anecdotal, once-in-a- lifetime observations, as recorded by my father and Gord Toole in several interviews given over the years since this historic event. Will Snag remain North America’s "cold pole?" Only time will tell.



How Cold Was the Coldest Day in Canadian History?

- At -80°F, the people’s voices and barking dogs in the village of Snag could be plainly heard at the airport four miles away. Read on for more extreme facts from the coldest day in Canadian history:

- An aircraft that flew over Snag that day at 10,000 feet was first heard when still more than 20 miles away, and later, when overhead, still at 10,000 feet, the engine roar was deafening. It sounded like it was in your bedroom! It woke everyone who was sleeping at the time because they thought the airplane was landing at the airport.

- A piece of thin ice, when broken, sounded exactly like breaking glass.

- Ice on the White River, about a mile east of the airport, cracked and boomed loudly, like gunfire, amplified by a cap of warmer air lying over intensely cold air on the ground, bouncing sound waves across great distances.

- The extreme cold air generated intense radio static, much like the crackling sounds heard during a thunderstorm.

- Exhaled breath instantly froze with a hissing noise, and stayed suspended in the air at head level in long vapour streaks several hundred meters long, like miniature condensation trails from a jet aircraft. These patches of human "fog" remained in the still air for three to four minutes, before falling to the ground as powdery ice crystals. One observer found such a trail still marking his path when he returned along the same route 15 minutes later. Becoming lost was of no concern!

- For days, a small fog or steam patch would appear over the sled dogs, at a height of 15 to 20 feet. It would disappear only in the warm part of the day when the temperature warmed up to -60°F.

- A chunk of ice was so cold that, when brought into a warm room, it took five full minutes before there was any trace of moisture, even when held in a warm hand.

- A cupful of cold water was thrown high into the air, just to see what would happen. Before it hit the ground, it made a hissing noise, froze and fell as tiny round pellets of ice the size of wheat kernels. Spit also froze before hitting the ground.

- At such temperatures, metal snapped like ice, wood became petrified, even paper became brittle and rubber was just like cement. The sled dogs’ leather harnesses would break if bent.

- After seconds outdoors, nose hairs froze rigidly and your eyes would tear. Facial hair and glasses become thickly crusted with frozen breath. You had to be careful not to inhale too deeply for fear of freezing or scalding your lungs from the frigid air. The only other discomfort caused by the cold were numerous cases of beginning frostbite, particularly the familiar "ping" as the tip of one’s nose froze. "It was easy to freeze your nose at -70°F without even knowing it was cold."

- The animals didn’t appear to suffer too much during this two-week spell when the temperatures never climbed above -64°F. Two horses, owned by a local trapper, used to visit the cookhouse every morning. It was amazing the things they would eat: apple pie, wieners, buns and cakes, and as an extra treat the cook even fed them ice cream one morning at -76°F. During their wandering around outside, almost eight inches of ice would build up on their hooves, making it look like they were up on stilts.

- The stamina of the sled dogs was truly remarkable. They never bothered to go into their kennels, preferring instead to lay on top of their kennels, curled up with their heads tucked in towards their bellies. A band of frost fog formed over their heads, keeping them reasonably warm.

- Starting machinery was a chore. Getting an engine started was no guarantee it would continue to run. At that temperature, the oil and transmission fluid would coagulate into something approaching a solid.

- And finally, truck tires could splay open when they hit ruts in the road.
Fascinating, but glad I missed it!
 

Lzed

MobiStaff
Site Staff
Real Name
Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
I can’t imagine -81 either though at some oint it just a number :) Coldest I had seen was years ago when we lived in Bradwell and the one morning the thermometer was showing as low as it could go which was -60. Car even though it was plugged in refused to start so took the day off and spent a good chunk of the day in our hot tub so I never really worried to much. I added another heater, a magnetic on the oil pan of the car and made sure it was on and the next day it started. The next day we were back up to mid -30s and I had not seen anything like that since. Last night was cold here -38.8 and high so far today was -24 but back to -27 now. Normals are -7=8 and -15 so almost 200 degrees colder than normal. Still no major upswings in the 7 day forecasts which is not what I would like but... Some places are setting new records but coldest here is around -42 so we are not far off old records.
 

Lzed

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Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
Well we hit -42 here last night high is right now at -23. New coldest day since they have been tracking weather here. I heard around 10 places here in the province set new low records and some for the last couple of nights have been setting new records.
Records here have been kept since 1884 or 1885, supposed to be -15 on monday then drop back down to highs of -20 and lows or -30 so no real change in sight....
 

Starzee

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Star Greathouse
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iPhone X
My 365
My MobiTog 365
Well we hit -42 here last night high is right now at -23. New coldest day since they have been tracking weather here. I heard around 10 places here in the province set new low records and some for the last couple of nights have been setting new records.
Records here have been kept since 1884 or 1885, supposed to be -15 on monday then drop back down to highs of -20 and lows or -30 so no real change in sight....
I’m told that -40 is the magic temperature where Celsius is the same as Fahrenheit. I’ve never experienced it. I’ll just take your word that it’s plenty cold!!!
 

Lzed

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Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
I’m told that -40 is the magic temperature where Celsius is the same as Fahrenheit. I’ve never experienced it. I’ll just take your word that it’s plenty cold!!!
Yes it is that magic place where its the same in both.
I could say that its a dry cold so doesn’t feel as bad but that would be lying :) it’s still far to cold for my likes. Though right now it show zero for humidity. Many years ago we had gone out to Victoria for Christmas and the one night there was -13 or -14 but humidity was almost 100% and no matter how you dressed it you felt cold. I even slept that night with my winter coat on. This year even they (west coast) are far colder then normal with lows around -5. Normally by this time of year they are bragging about how well the flowers are doing.

Still trying to figure what the heck my sister is doing.... They used to live out in Pritchard BC which is between Kamloops and Salmon Arm but things they had went the wrong way and they ended up selling and moved down to a place called Gibson’s Landing where she was a recreation therapist. She retired a couple years ago and they were living in a condo that of Brians kids bought before they moved to London. Well a few months ago I was talking to my sister and she said they were moving again, this time to Texada Island. It literally in the middle of nowhere. The Island is a good size at around 30 miles in length but getting there is what I would consider a pain in the behind. Three ferries and the better part of 6hrs from Vancouver. I know they didn’t have a lot of money and will now have a mortgage starting. Brian is 75 this year and my sister will turn 65the end of June. They bought a house on Texada Island and it had been up for sale for 2-3years so they got it fora decent price but still. Then found out that the furnace wasn’t working and they would have to remove it as well as the oil tank for it and they thought about putting in electric baseboard heaters but then found that would mean the electrical would have to be fixed. Originally they said the breakers were the old style glass ones which would have meant redoing all the electrical and update it. Electrician was going through and found that there was a proper electrical box and the old one with the glass breakers was being used as a sub-panel so they lucked out some as electrical will still be expensive but not as bad as they expected. Te do have internet though I gather very slow unless they want to drive into the nearest little town and cell phone works but again not great service there. I think Joyce is going to land up having to go back to work to pay for things but I guess time will tell. Texada has only about 1000 residents on it. There is a landing strip for small planes and as I said the ferries but still is a long way out of the way.
 

Lzed

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Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
17 February 2019

Well still cold here, so far this month our average high has been -21.6 and average low at -29.87. Long term averages for feb is -10 and -20. Today is the warmest it’s been since the beginning of the month and high today has been -13. By the current forecaste it going to be cool the next couple days and around midweek supposed to close to long term averages with highs around -9 or -10. Lots of new snow in the past week with probably close to a foot overall.

This is Washington Oregon yesterday morning, tulips are out and around 8”of new snow...
989910B5-5616-442F-A8D1-3F512F3BAE98.png


Victoria had over a foot of snow beginning of last week and got another 6” or so on Thursday but will not last long, currently lower mainland and Vancouver island are around +6
 

Lzed

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Real Name
Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
19 February 2019

Remains cold but clear so at least no more snow. Highs are supposed to stay around -15 and lows around -30 for the next week...
This is Lorna’s roof yesterday, three guys were up there shovelling all the snow off the roof (I didn’t think it was deep enough to have it cleared off, along the edge you can see it might be a foot at most and we normally get enough wind that it doesn’t stay up there) and that means it all goes down so Rollie from the next house was out with his snow blower moving it farther out in the yard. Lorna might have issues when it melts as there is a window well at the corner of her house and right now there’s close to 5’ of snow covering it.

DFF3D0ED-B1C5-43EF-971A-9B7871D4B1F5.jpeg
 

JillyG

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Jilly
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My 365
My MobiTog 365
17 February 2019

Well still cold here, so far this month our average high has been -21.6 and average low at -29.87. Long term averages for feb is -10 and -20. Today is the warmest it’s been since the beginning of the month and high today has been -13. By the current forecaste it going to be cool the next couple days and around midweek supposed to close to long term averages with highs around -9 or -10. Lots of new snow in the past week with probably close to a foot overall.

This is Washington Oregon yesterday morning, tulips are out and around 8”of new snow...
View attachment 121001

Victoria had over a foot of snow beginning of last week and got another 6” or so on Thursday but will not last long, currently lower mainland and Vancouver island are around +6
I love this image. The colours of the tulips against the snow, and the scenery in the background, they’re just lovely.
 

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I love this image. The colours of the tulips against the snow, and the scenery in the background, they’re just lovely.
I really like the tulips against the snow. Too bad the tulips will not survive or not until it warms up again.
 

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20 February 2019

Supposed to warm up a touch so highs are around -10 and lows in -teens but after that supposed to cool off so we are back to -20’s for the high and -30’s overnight. Wonder when the heck its going to warm up’

This is today, nice and sunny but -16 and not supposed to get any warmer today. Lots more snow around then we have had and a whole lot more then we had last year.
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Up to yesterday our average for the month is still -19.5 high and -29.5 low...
 

RoseCat

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17 February 2019

Well still cold here, so far this month our average high has been -21.6 and average low at -29.87. Long term averages for feb is -10 and -20. Today is the warmest it’s been since the beginning of the month and high today has been -13. By the current forecaste it going to be cool the next couple days and around midweek supposed to close to long term averages with highs around -9 or -10. Lots of new snow in the past week with probably close to a foot overall.

This is Washington Oregon yesterday morning, tulips are out and around 8”of new snow...
View attachment 121001

Victoria had over a foot of snow beginning of last week and got another 6” or so on Thursday but will not last long, currently lower mainland and Vancouver island are around +6
What a fantastic image! Those tulips are so vibrant against the snow.

Is this a town called Washington in Oregon? Or along the border of Washington and Oregon?
 

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22 February 2019

Continues cool out here but at least today its -13 and sunny and little wind so Steven said it wasn’t too bad out there.

Spent close to two hours on the phone yesterday with my cousin in North Vancouver. I was planning on calling because they had a snow warning out there yesterday (and again today) but she phoned instead. I enjoy Marg and catching up with her and that side of the family is always good. Yesterday they never did get snow or at least not up where they are in North Vancouver but today it was snowing pretty good so she sent me a couple pictures. Snow at basically the end of February is almost unheard of out there, normally by this time flowers are blooming and its more rain but at least warmer at +4 for lows and around +10 for highs. Karen said yesterday just before Marg called that on the news they were talking about snow in both Texas and Arizona which again is pretty rare for that far south. Today and tomorrow are supposed to be about -13 for the high then supposed to cool off again to -20’s for the high and -30’s for low and by next weekend bac to about the same as now, still colder then normal...
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Long term weather says its supposed to stay colder than normal until middle of next month
 

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1 March 2019

Karen’s birthday was on the 25th and she had a nice surprise. Her brother Allan and his partner Christina stopped by for a few hours. Karen thought they had gone home. They had taken a month and went down to California and Arizona to see some family (one daughter of Linda’s and famil live in Sunnyvale) and friends. They were back in Calgary around the 20th and Karen thought the had driven home. What they did was spend a few days in Swift Current with Allan’s daughter Elizabeth and her family and had plans to stop her on the 25th. We didn’t know they were coming so a nice surprise. They stopped at Costco and got a thing of Shepards pie so put that in to warm up and had it for lunch. They brought Karen a couple dozen red and White roses. They were here until around 3pm and were going north to Saskatoon to a conference the next day and to see Allan’s son Mathew.

Mathew sent us an invitation to his wedding but not sure if we are going, thinking not at this point. They picked a lousy time for it as it is the same weekend as the cousins get together in Moose Jaw and they are having it way out in the sticks, closest town is close to an hour drive on a good day and its north and east of Saskatoon so close to a 4-5 hour drive from here. So you either have to get a hotel for likely 3 days which can be pricey and as I said still a fair drive from any hotel.

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And back to the weather..... Farmer’s almanac and it seems enviornment Canada agrees with them is that April and March are both going to cooler then normal and the sa b around the same as this past month, around 10-15 egrets colder then normal. June we are supposed to be close to normal. In an case the cold is lingering a long longer here. Last month average was -18.5 for the high and just sh of -30 for the low. Since keeping records they say there has been only one other year (1936) that the month was colder so around 80 years and it was only colder for the average high by a degree or so.

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Ryn S

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17 February 2019

Well still cold here, so far this month our average high has been -21.6 and average low at -29.87. Long term averages for feb is -10 and -20. Today is the warmest it’s been since the beginning of the month and high today has been -13. By the current forecaste it going to be cool the next couple days and around midweek supposed to close to long term averages with highs around -9 or -10. Lots of new snow in the past week with probably close to a foot overall.

This is Washington Oregon yesterday morning, tulips are out and around 8”of new snow...
View attachment 121001

Victoria had over a foot of snow beginning of last week and got another 6” or so on Thursday but will not last long, currently lower mainland and Vancouver island are around +6
That is SOME picture! I’ve lived to tell the tale of 2-3 nights where it got down to -40 degrees F. We spent the better part of the afternoon are early evening planning ways to keep our car engines warm enough to restart. I remember it being something I wasn’t in any hurry to repeat...but we survived it AND our cars startled everyday so all the rigmarole paid off.
 

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That is SOME picture! I’ve lived to tell the tale of 2-3 nights where it got down to -40 degrees F. We spent the better part of the afternoon are early evening planning ways to keep our car engines warm enough to restart. I remember it being something I wasn’t in any hurry to repeat...but we survived it AND our cars startled everyday so all the rigmarole paid off.
I have had only a couple of cars the never seemed to have any issue with cold, Back in the 70’s we had a AMC Hornet Wagon and it it never had any issues, no matter how cold, the other was our 93 ford Aerostar. I remember the one year we were always short on driveway space so the one winter it sat for about 3 weeks (we had a full size van with a lift so were using it) on the side street and I thought I might have to plug it in as it was around -30 and blowing that day but opened the door and interior lights were bright so tried it and started without an issue.
Normall though cars will be plugged in, there is a block heater that is like an immersion element that fits in the engine block in the antifreeze and it will heat the antifreeze which keeps things warm enough to start. Best block heater we had though was on another car and this heater fit in one of the heater hoses and worked just like the old coffee percolators, would suck in cold antifreeze and heat it to near boiling then pushes that into the heater hose and the engine block. It worked good because it circulated the antifreeze including through the heater core which kept the car interior a little warmer than otherwise. Because it circulated the antifreeze the engine warmed up a lot faster. The immersion type heaters work on convection but generally means block right at the heater is the hottest and farther away was cooler. I used to have another heater but it was on a big magnet and yu could put it anywhere but was best on the oil pan and heat the I’ll up.
When cold oil gets thicker and thicker and become like molasses which make things harder on the engine.
Diesel engines are even harder to start when cold versus a gas engine and I know people with them that don’t turn them off and just leave them idling whe its cold out.
With gas engines ou could go and start the engine ever 4-5 hours and let it warm up a bit then turn it off.
At home though if its in the garage it is generally not any issue even if its not plugged in as at least its out of the wind. If we know we are going somewhere we also have a timer so the car is plugged into it and it is set to come on about 3 or 4 hours before we would have to leave.

This year it has been far colder than normal and the are still saying March, April and Ma will be cooler than normal, I reall hope not, I am so tired of the cold now....
 

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3 March 2019

Despite the cold weather outside (right now -17 with windchills in the -40’s) Karen Hibiscus tree decided to start blooming
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This was late yesterday afternoon and stayed nice even this morning but just starting to end this afternoon

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So by later will be done, there are more coming but may be a few days and her little Hibiscus also has buds starting as does the Orchids
 

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10 March 2019

By the forecast we are supposed to be above freezing starting tuesday for the first time in almost a month and a half. Forecast for the rest of next week is right around freezing for the high. The past couple days have been pretty nice compared to what we have had with highs around -5 and lows around -20 which is pretty close to to long term normals which is -5 and -15. Streets have been melting as had the snow on the roofs facing south so we had some iceicles for a day or so but most have fallen off. Even with the milder temperatures a few days have felt a lot colder with the wind but today it is pretty calm so far.

This morning the grader was as out and clearing ice and packed snow off the drains and I imagine in the next couple of days they will be around with the steam truck and make sure drains are open.
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