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New MobiZero Challenge #6 11/25-12/31

FundyBrian

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Amen, sister! :lmao: Even when I have an image that looks good straight out of the camera, I always fool around with it to see how it looks with different tweaks. This explains why my Camera Roll fills up with variants.
The question of is: How fo you get the image to come out the way you want “in camera”. I know there is always more you could do. But what is the main thing that must be right in order for you to find your “in camera” images acceptable?
 

Starzee

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The MobiZero challenge really is a challenge. We’ve come to depend so much on our favourite little tweaks.
For me, the colour is the main thing I have to get right.
In terms of the MobiZero challenge, it is easy enough to adjust exposure, focus, etc. on screen,
but few apps have good enough colour control.

One thing for certain, any app that only has Auto white balance will be of no use in MobiZero because they rely on you adjusting the colour in editing.

To get good colour “in camera” you need to get out of Auto White Balance and select the proper setting for the conditions (sunny day, shade, overcast, indoor incandescent, fluorescent, etc.). I presume these are the daylight settings discribed as being acceptable in this challenge.

Check your apps to see which ones allow you to select the standard white balance settings. That will get you in the ball park. The only thing better is apps that allow you to measure the colour from a white balance card or neutral grey card and lock that reading. PureShot, and 645 Pro are among the very few. Interesting that those two apps are made by the same developer.
I remember you bringing up white balance before. I think we each have our “thing” that we go to first. In thinking about this, I was reminded of my two favorite editing techniques I used all the time in Photoshop and now use with Affinity, Procreate, or ArtStudio Pro. They would probably work in any layering app that has brushes.

The first is to duplicate the image, set the blend mode to multiply, then use the transparency slider to adjust. It makes the tones richer and gives the image a little depth.

The other is a dodge and burn technique. Add an empty layer, fill it with 50% gray and set the blend mode to Overlay. Then you paint with light, use white to lighten any area or black to darken. You can be very precise.

Of course, you can’t post your results in this thread. That wouldn’t be Mobizero. ;)
 

Starzee

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The question of is: How fo you get the image to come out the way you want “in camera”. I know there is always more you could do. But what is the main thing that must be right in order for you to find your “in camera” images acceptable?
Oops. That’s what I get for responding before I’ve read all the posts! The one thing I do whenever I take a picture is adjust the exposure. I almost always pull it down. I do that when I tap the screen to focus. It seems to add detail.
 

Starzee

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Ahem, pardon me.
I interupt this challenge for a quick announcement. I’ll be taking charge of the Mobizero Challenge. Thanks to the fabulous JillyG JIlly for keeping this going. I am going with sinnerjohn John’s suggestion of running this for month. I like the idea of having a lot of time to set up and take the perfect image. It’s a refreshing change from point, shoot, fix.

I now return you to your regularly scheduled thread. :)
 

JillyG

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Ahem, pardon me.
I interupt this challenge for a quick announcement. I’ll be taking charge of the Mobizero Challenge. Thanks to the fabulous JillyG JIlly for keeping this going. I am going with sinnerjohn John’s suggestion of running this for month. I like the idea of having a lot of time to set up and take the perfect image. It’s a refreshing change from point, shoot, fix.

I now return you to your regularly scheduled thread. :)
:lol: Shouldn’t you be basting a turkey? Happy Thanksgiving!
 

terse

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The question of is: How fo you get the image to come out the way you want “in camera”. I know there is always more you could do. But what is the main thing that must be right in order for you to find your “in camera” images acceptable?
Most important for me is to adjust the exposure. Like Starzee again, I usually pull it down to get deeper color and avoid clipped highlights. The auto exposure too often overexposes a bit, to my eye, and I'd rather have clipped shadows than clipped highlights. (I usually use ISO Priority mode if it's available.) Autofocus works most of the time, though I'll go to tap-to-focus or manual focus in cases where I've learned autofocus is likely to be fooled. I don't try to frame the image closely in camera but instead leave space all around what I think is the image. (I say "I think" because frequently I find a better arrangement/crop while editing.)
 

FundyBrian

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360 pano, Inch Arran Light, Dalhousie, NB.
9D7F8A99-F7B7-4018-BBB3-320529AAD017.jpeg

The original image size was 2500 x 14526 px made with DMD Panorama. This one is the original image except resized smaller with iWatermark +.
I discovered long ago that every single iPhone photo editing app will downsize these images, without telling you, during editing, until Affinity Photo came along. The app has very minimal controls. Mostly, you start your first photo at the brightest area and let the rest fall where they will.
It does an excellent job making 360 panoramas but it is frustrating not to have more camera controls.

Really, the only good use for these images is when you can view them full screen in the interactive format on the DMD website.

When I do edit these panoramas the main reason is to retouch the green flare you get when the sun is within the frame. Luckily this picture doesn’t have any direct sunlight in it.
 

FundyBrian

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Imagine you’re using a film camera. The moment you press the shutter any opportunity you have to influence the outcome is gone. What you shot is what you got. Much like MobiZero.
Knowing that, what would you do differently than you do with a digital camera?

Probably you would think a little more about what you’re doing. You only have the choice of outdoor film or indoor film. If you are using daylight film on a sunny day you’re golden. In every other circumstance you will need some sort of colour correction filter to match the lighting conditions. But don’t forget to add the exposure correction factor for the filter

However, you have one additional option and that is your choice of film. Kodachrome 25 would be a good choice for neutral colours and the finest detail and grain. For a boost in reds and oranges pick Kodachrome 64. For luscious greens go for Fujichrome 50 RFP. Brilliant blues and yellows with Ektachrome 64. Etc. You choose your colour response by picking the film that matches your preferences in those conditions.
In the film days it was a lot more common for photographers to carry more camera bodies, each with a different film type.
 

rizole

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I saw your b&w version first so am now cursed to be unable to like this version ;) it’s nice but conversion made it awesome.
And that's the problem with not editing of course. When I create a form, document or graphic, I work and rework it till it has a good or good enough aesthetic. There's a lot to be said for setting it up well in the first place, naturally, but a lot to be said for touching it up after too. :)
 

terse

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Imagine you’re using a film camera. The moment you press the shutter any opportunity you have to influence the outcome is gone. What you shot is what you got.
That's true if you're immediately handing your roll of exposed film off to a shop for processing and printing. But if you develop your own film and/or do your own darkroom printing, you still have a number of ways to influence the final outcome, including choice of developer, development time, type of paper, dodging/burning, and enlarger filters. Am I just being dense and missing your point?
 
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Nagaisgich

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And that's the problem with not editing of course. When I create a form, document or graphic, I work and rework it till it has a good or good enough aesthetic. There's a lot to be said for setting it up well in the first place, naturally, but a lot to be said for touching it up after too. :)
For sure. The set-up is just the bones. Like a model without make up ;)
 

FundyBrian

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That's true if you're immediately handing your roll of exposed film off to a shop for processing and printing. But if you develop your own film and/or do your own darkroom printing, you still have a number of ways to influence the final outcome, including choice of developer, development time, type of paper, dodging/burning, and enlarger filters. Am I just being dense and missing your point?
Forget black and white film. Think about colour slide film. You can’t do anything to that once it is exposed. You simply wait for it to come back from developing.

As a beginning photographer you can’t learn much from shooting print film because there is the second interpretation, made by the processing equipment and the operator, that fixes up your mistakes. With slide film there is no intervention. What you shot is what you got. Now you can really evaluate the fruits of your labours.

The reverse is also true. Once you become sufficiently skilled such that you can nail any difficult exposure situation, and then you decide to also get some prints made, you discover the automated machinery at the lab works against you in getting what you want.

The point is that shooting film is an exact parallel to photographing for MobiZero. To get a picture to come out well with no editing requires a different type of thinking. More care in getting things right at the time of exposure. Too often people have a fairly careless approach to shooting digital because they have the editing phase to fix their mistakes.

You can tell how well you are doing at the exposing stage by keeping track of what sort of edits you routinely have to make. Always adjusting exposure in editing? Always fixing the colour balance? Very few apps have anything better than approximate adjustments. For instance, in the native camera app you can’t say, I want this 2/3 of a stop darker. No, you are just guessing.
 

FundyBrian

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And that's the problem with not editing of course. When I create a form, document or graphic, I work and rework it till it has a good or good enough aesthetic. There's a lot to be said for setting it up well in the first place, naturally, but a lot to be said for touching it up after too. :)
You are speaking of a higher level of image editing where the nuances make the subtle differences you want.
MobiZero is a good challenge because it points out how much people rely on editing to simply get a well exposed and colour balanced result because of not enough care at the time of exposing.
Part of that is the illusion that all you have to do is press the button and the camera will look after everything for you. It simply isn’t true. Very few apps even have the necessary controls that a proper camera app should have. The vast majority of camera apps are what I would call snapshot apps. Even if you want to control certain things the options are not there to allow it.
 
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Ryn S

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011F27AD-8982-420C-9CD8-6B77047B39DD.jpeg

this is the raw image...in the edited version, when I tweaked it, I added to the black point, decreased the exposure a tiny bit, increased the luminosity and sharpened it a tad...all those changes made it a nicer image as did warming it up a few points. But this image is the one prior to edits. I liked it well enough, but the highlight areas of the water are a little blown out and I wanted to see if I could do a passable save by darkening it down a bit. It made it a bit richer, but the whites on the water weren’t recovered.
 
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