MobiColour Result: #241 Theme R U L E. O F. T H I R D S

zenjenny

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Welcome to MobiTog's Colour Challenge #241
22 February - 7 March

DE4D9B48-7B32-4A60-91BB-EDEF2D89AB9F.jpeg

‘My son’s eye [. . . ] a moment I wasn’t going to miss’
by rvilhena Ricardo, winner MC#240: ‘Capture the Moment’


Rules:
Mobile photography colour images
One image per post please
Please list device/s and apps used to create your image
Winner will choose theme/no theme and judge the next MCC
Please see the Rules and Guidelines for MobiChallenges posted HERE
Check out our previous winners in the Gallery HERE



JUDGE: rvilhena Ricardo THEME: Rule of Thirds
 
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zenjenny

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sinnerjohn

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Its amazing how many photos get posted here and elsewhere that completely disregard the rule of thirds. Not always purposely either!
Not saying I'm innocent, not at all. Its making me think how I can improve my photography and remember the things we should.
So come up people, throw up some photos :D

Might be nice to get some critique along the way as well, or is that too scary ;)
 

zenjenny

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Its amazing how many photos get posted here and elsewhere that completely disregard the rule of thirds. Not always purposely either!
Not saying I'm innocent, not at all. Its making me think how I can improve my photography and remember the things we should.
So come up people, throw up some photos :D

Might be nice to get some critique along the way as well, or is that too scary ;)
I was hoping someone would give a bit of background for the rule of thirds for the thread. I imagine most of us know what it is, a fair few members would know /have practised a lot - I hope I’m not the only member whose understanding stops at ‘rule’ and ‘thirds’ and ‘good idea’.

A few sentences, John? For the likes of me? :)
 

sinnerjohn

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As you asked zenjenny

The basic principle behind the rule of thirds is to imagine breaking an image down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so that you have 9 parts. As follows.

The rule of thirds 1


As you’re taking an image you would have done this in your mind through your phone display that you use to frame your shot.

With this grid in mind the ‘rule of thirds’ now identifies four important parts of the image that you should consider placing points of interest in as you frame your image.

Not only this – but it also gives you four ‘lines’ that are also useful positions for elements in your photo.

The rule of thirds 2


The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines that your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally.
Studies have shown that when viewing images that people’s eyes usually go to one of the intersection points most naturally rather than the center of the shot – using the rule of thirds works with this natural way of viewing an image rather than working against it.

1614325838691.png


1614326572206.png


Copied wholesale from the https://digital-photography-school.com/rule-of-thirds/
The images are not mine.

I'll also add that Human eyes tend to track from left to right when looking at an image, so say a figure walking towards the right side of a shot may seem more pleasing than one on the left side moving out of frame.

There really is a ton of online information about the Rule of Thirds Jen, not only photograph but its application in Art as well.
If anyone is sufficiently interested, go seek and hopefully pick up some tips.

There is also a lot of info about breaking the Rule of Thirds. Its actually made me realise what an awful photo I posted the other day in the B/W challenge, the top of the chimney is far to near the edge of the frame, horrible :lmao:

As ever this is all subjective and it works in video too.

Finally someone who totally disregards the rule of thirds and in actual fact its his trademark. Two minutes of the very brilliant Wes Anderson.
 

Starzee

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As you asked zenjenny

The basic principle behind the rule of thirds is to imagine breaking an image down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so that you have 9 parts. As follows.

The rule of thirds 1


As you’re taking an image you would have done this in your mind through your phone display that you use to frame your shot.

With this grid in mind the ‘rule of thirds’ now identifies four important parts of the image that you should consider placing points of interest in as you frame your image.

Not only this – but it also gives you four ‘lines’ that are also useful positions for elements in your photo.

The rule of thirds 2


The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines that your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally.
Studies have shown that when viewing images that people’s eyes usually go to one of the intersection points most naturally rather than the center of the shot – using the rule of thirds works with this natural way of viewing an image rather than working against it.

View attachment 165028

View attachment 165029

Copied wholesale from the https://digital-photography-school.com/rule-of-thirds/
The images are not mine.

I'll also add that Human eyes tend to track from left to right when looking at an image, so say a figure walking towards the right side of a shot may seem more pleasing than one on the left side moving out of frame.

There really is a ton of online information about the Rule of Thirds Jen, not only photograph but its application in Art as well.
If anyone is sufficiently interested, go seek and hopefully pick up some tips.

There is also a lot of info about breaking the Rule of Thirds. Its actually made me realise what an awful photo I posted the other day in the B/W challenge, the top of the chimney is far to near the edge of the frame, horrible :lmao:

As ever this is all subjective and it works in video too.

Finally someone who totally disregards the rule of thirds and in actual fact its his trademark. Two minutes of the very brilliant Wes Anderson.
Nicely demonstrated and love the video. zenjenny Jen you KNOW rules were made to be broken.....
 

terse

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As you asked zenjenny

The basic principle behind the rule of thirds is to imagine breaking an image down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so that you have 9 parts. As follows.

The rule of thirds 1


As you’re taking an image you would have done this in your mind through your phone display that you use to frame your shot.

With this grid in mind the ‘rule of thirds’ now identifies four important parts of the image that you should consider placing points of interest in as you frame your image.

Not only this – but it also gives you four ‘lines’ that are also useful positions for elements in your photo.

The rule of thirds 2


The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines that your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally.
Studies have shown that when viewing images that people’s eyes usually go to one of the intersection points most naturally rather than the center of the shot – using the rule of thirds works with this natural way of viewing an image rather than working against it.

View attachment 165028

View attachment 165029

Copied wholesale from the https://digital-photography-school.com/rule-of-thirds/
The images are not mine.

I'll also add that Human eyes tend to track from left to right when looking at an image, so say a figure walking towards the right side of a shot may seem more pleasing than one on the left side moving out of frame.

There really is a ton of online information about the Rule of Thirds Jen, not only photograph but its application in Art as well.
If anyone is sufficiently interested, go seek and hopefully pick up some tips.

There is also a lot of info about breaking the Rule of Thirds. Its actually made me realise what an awful photo I posted the other day in the B/W challenge, the top of the chimney is far to near the edge of the frame, horrible :lmao:

As ever this is all subjective and it works in video too.

Finally someone who totally disregards the rule of thirds and in actual fact its his trademark. Two minutes of the very brilliant Wes Anderson.
Good explanation. I'd add that placing the main object in the center of the frame usually produces a still balance that tends to keep your eyes in the center, while placing it around the thirds can create a dynamic balance that implies some motion and tends to draw your eyes across the frame. Both can work and both can fail, depending on the image itself, and the world of images is full of exceptions. (The still of the Wes Anderson clip makes a great example of an exception because although the main object is centered, my eyes are drawn to scanning the kids in the background, helped along by the widescreen aspect ratio.)
 
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