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Silhouette posts

rizole

In for it!
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Rizole
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Since this thread started I've had a niggling problem I couldn't put my finger on but have put words to it today. What's the difference between a shadow and a silhouette?

My problem is that a shadow is where light is blocked from falling on a surface. Where as a silhouette is caused by viewing something that blocks light and so appears dark against a light background. But the difference there is just one of viewpoint.
This pic illustrates what I mean.
silhouette.jpg

The difference between the top and bottom pic is that the top is looking at the shadow from within it and the bottom looking at the shadow from outside.

So I looked it up and a silhouette literally started out as a black shape on a light background, nothing to do with light sources and shadows, the term has just come along as it's been used in different art forms.

They are named after Ettienne Silhouette.

Anyway. It then occurred to me that I could try and photograph the silhouette and the shadow of the silhouetted object in one pic.
20190919_165558-01_1568909284766.jpg
 

terse

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Ted
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The difference between the top and bottom pic is that the top is looking at the shadow from within it and the bottom looking at the shadow from outside.
I hadn't thought of it that way. You could also say that a photograph of a silhouette is a photograph of the object itself (although with all the detail lost), while a photograph of a shadow is a photograph of a projection of the object.
 

FundyBrian

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Kayaking through Arch Rock.
D50F4EAC-B65D-43DE-94F8-1E7E46E86644.jpeg

This photo came from a series where I was photographing Fabi kayaking through Arch Rock at Inch Arran, NB, Canada. It can only be done at a certain level of the tide. The other pictures leading up to and after the arch had good colour but this one flipped to a silhouette with very little colour just at the point when she paddled into the shadow of the rock. Arch Rock is actually a free-standing rock with a hole through it even though it looks more like a cave in this view.
 

FundyBrian

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Brian Townsend
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My 365
My MobiTog 365
Since this thread started I've had a niggling problem I couldn't put my finger on but have put words to it today. What's the difference between a shadow and a silhouette?

My problem is that a shadow is where light is blocked from falling on a surface. Where as a silhouette is caused by viewing something that blocks light and so appears dark against a light background. But the difference there is just one of viewpoint.
This pic illustrates what I mean.
View attachment 149671
The difference between the top and bottom pic is that the top is looking at the shadow from within it and the bottom looking at the shadow from outside.

So I looked it up and a silhouette literally started out as a black shape on a light background, nothing to do with light sources and shadows, the term has just come along as it's been used in different art forms.

They are named after Ettienne Silhouette.

Anyway. It then occurred to me that I could try and photograph the silhouette and the shadow of the silhouetted object in one pic.
View attachment 149672
A very nice example. I don’t think it is necessary for a silhouette to have a light (or close to white) background, just lighter than the silhouetted subject.

Some situations naturally produce silhouettes because of the lighting (such as sunsets) while others appear as silhouettes only because of deliberate underexposure for dramatic effect.

I remember in a photo workshop long ago we were making silhouettes of people casting a shadow on a white translucent panel. There was a studio light behind the subject. You simply needed to stand in line with the light and subject. The translucent panel had the effect of bringing everything into a single plane. But we quickly got tired of the white background (which was actually the foreground) and began using coloured lights and coloured filters on the camera lenses.
 
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