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What type of film should I use?

Jerold

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Jerold Cuico
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iPhone 6s
I’ve a photography aficionado and have recently ventured into film photography. I’m using the Canon AE-1 camera, which I’m planning to take with me on my Ukraine ski trip. Any advice on what type of film I should get? I’m going to buy the film online, so there won’t be a problem with its availability. I appreciate any photography tips for shooting outdoors in a winter setting as well!
 

RoseCat

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Catherine
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iPhone 7 Plus
I’ve a photography aficionado and have recently ventured into film photography. I’m using the Canon AE-1 camera, which I’m planning to take with me on my Ukraine ski trip. Any advice on what type of film I should get? I’m going to buy the film online, so there won’t be a problem with its availability. I appreciate any photography tips for shooting outdoors in a winter setting as well!
:lmao: You’ve got the wrong site, dude. We only deal with photography on mobile devices.
What is film?
LOL... :lol:

Although many of us here started out in the film photography arena, MobiTog is a mobile photography community. All images here are made and edited on mobile devices, i.e. phones, tablets, iPods.

I know there are members here who can still give good photography tips for shooting outdoors in the winter, and perhaps your interest might be piqued enough to give it a go with your own mobile device.

Feel free to have a look around in our different forums to see the amazing work people create with their mobile device.
 

Lzed

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Larry Zasitko
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iPad (Generic)
I’ve a photography aficionado and have recently ventured into film photography. I’m using the Canon AE-1 camera, which I’m planning to take with me on my Ukraine ski trip. Any advice on what type of film I should get? I’m going to buy the film online, so there won’t be a problem with its availability. I appreciate any photography tips for shooting outdoors in a winter setting as well!
As mentioned this is a site for mobile devices photography.
I came from the world of real film cameras and still have 6 cameras. One is setup for our winters here in the Canadian prairies where it can get to -40 during winter. The biggest problem you will have is keeping batteries for the camera warm enough. In my case I have a motor drive for a Yashica FR1 that has the option of an external battery pack so it plugs into the motor drive and has a cord thats about 4 foot long and battery pack stays in you pocket and warm enough to keep working. I use Ziess lenses on it as the Yashica body’s use the Contax camera bayonet mounts. Three of my film cameras are Contax body’s and all my lenses are Ziess. You can sometime have problems with fogging in the lenses when going from cold to warm and it may take a few minutes to get rid of the fog.
If your body is motorized the other thing that can happen if it is very fast you can get static marks or what looks like lightening bolts across an image. Now I have not had that problem with my camera but have seen it happen with a friends Nikon camera.

Film is quit subjective as different brands tend to look slightly different from another brand but that said I have for the most part stuck with Fuji film.
 

alexfairkon

MobiAddict
Real Name
Alex
Device
Android (Generic)
I am a user of LOMO 135 equipped with a spring vinder.
The camera freezes in winter. The lubricant freezes in the shutter and in the drive. In the cold some tape mechanisms tear films.
Tip: wear the camera under your outerwear closer to your body.
________________________________________________
Skiing is better to have an action camera. Or a smartphone with a good battery. Or both!
The question arises: Is it possible to equate the action camera with the external lens of a smartphone? And in general, how was the issue of legalization of SONY DSC-QX30 type lenses solved on this forum?
 
Last edited:

FundyBrian

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Brian Townsend
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iPhone 8 Plus
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I am a user of LOMO 135 equipped with a spring vinder.
The camera freezes in winter. The lubricant freezes in the shutter and in the drive. In the cold some tape mechanisms tear films.
Tip: wear the camera under your outerwear closer to your body.
________________________________________________
Skiing is better to have an action camera. Or a smartphone with a good battery. Or both!
The question arises: Is it possible to equate the action camera with the external lens of a smartphone? And in general, how was the issue of legalization of SONY DSC-QX30 type lenses solved on this forum?
The issue you raised about the accessory camera attachments as made by Sony, Olympus, and a couple of others, is a tricky problem. I’m quite interested in those devices as well. Basically they are self-contained cameras that simply use the iPhone as a viewer while the actual image is recorded using the larger sensor on the external device. It is the larger sensor that gives them the better image quality. I would say that in order for the pictures to be considered acceptable on MobiTog the original image needs to be captured on the internal camera sensor in the mobile device (iPhone, smartphone, iPod, iPad) and not on an external device. Attaching accessory lenses to the built-in camera is OK but recording images on an external sensor is not. I can use my iPhone as a remote viewer/controller for several different cameras but they all capture the image on the external device sensor and not directly on the iPhone sensor so that’s not allowed. This means that capturing the image on an external device and simultaneously sending it to your phone by wifi or Bluetooth and not even saving it on the external device is still not allowed. The key point is capturing the image directly on the built-in camera sensor on the phone.
 

FundyBrian

MobiStaff
Site Staff
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Brian Townsend
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iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
I’ve a photography aficionado and have recently ventured into film photography. I’m using the Canon AE-1 camera, which I’m planning to take with me on my Ukraine ski trip. Any advice on what type of film I should get? I’m going to buy the film online, so there won’t be a problem with its availability. I appreciate any photography tips for shooting outdoors in a winter setting as well!
I am a user of LOMO 135 equipped with a spring vinder.
The camera freezes in winter. The lubricant freezes in the shutter and in the drive. In the cold some tape mechanisms tear films.
Tip: wear the camera under your outerwear closer to your body.50.
________________________________________________
Sounds like you’re doing a lot of interesting things. My interest in photography took a jump forward around 1970 and of course everything was film in those days. The problem of cameras freezing up in the cold was quite common. Not many people live in places that are cold enough to experience the problem of their camera freezing up but it certainly happened to me quite often. Certain types of cameras were more prone to freezing than others. It depends on the type of mechanisms and what type of lubricants were used.

Photographers who worked a lot in cold weather used to send in their cameras to be prepared for cold weather, which meant stripping the camera down and removing any grease or thick lubricants. Eventually the manufacturers began to use lubricants that didn’t freeze up but batteries are still a problem. Having the film break in the cold was more common in the old days. More modern films were more flexible. Even so, it was a good idea to advance the film slowly and gently. Cameras with motor drives were more likely to tear the film. Another thing I tried was making an insulated “jacket” for the camera to help keep it warm. It works for an hour and then the camera needs to be warmed up again. These jackets were mostly made to soundproof a camera but they help with the cold also. The problem is that the camera has no internal heat source so the best you can do is slow down the cooling.

It is a good idea to put your camera in a tight plastic bag before bringing it indoors to help minimize condensation on the camera. Some cameras have internal moisture sensors (video cameras in particular) and they will shut the camera down until internal humidity drops to an acceptable level.

If you take a fully charged battery out in the cold it only has about 60% power. With regular cameras the solution was to keep a spare battery in a warm pocket and swap batteries often to keep them warm. I made a remote battery holder for one of my cameras I could keep in my pocket that was connected to the camera by a wire. Lithium batteries are the best choice in cold weather. Even if your mechanical camera seems to work OK in the cold the exposures may not be correct as the mechanisms slow down. The best solution is a camera with no moving parts, such as a mirrorless digital camera.
I use GoPro cameras a lot while skiing. They are perfect for that sort of thing. I also use a gyro stabilizer to steady the camera motion. For still photos you don’t need the stabilizer so much but for video the difference is night and day. Without a stabilizer video is barely watchable without motion sickness. I mount my stabilizer on my chest rather than my helmet. I also made a mount to attach my GoPro to the tip on one ski to get a different perspective. I also have a mount to put the GoPro at the bottom end of one ski pole. I have also used a hand-held gyro stabilizer, such as the DJI Osmo Mobile, for skiing and it works very well but if you fall it would most likely get broken.

While out in the cold I sometimes attach my iPhone to an external battery in my pocket using the regular Lightning to USB charge cord. Also, there are some iPhone cases with a built-in extra battery to give more photography time between charges. I like to use a tripod so it isn’t as handy to keep putting my phone back in an inside pocket.

This winter I plan to try attaching one of those hand warmer packets to the back of my iPhone to see if it helps keep the battery warm. I won’t put it in direct contact with the back of my phone but on the outside of the case in case the hand warmer gets too warm. I’ll put another hand warmer packet on the back of my hand (in my glove or photo mitts) to keep track of the temperature. The screen side of the phone is still exposed to the cold.

I can’t give you any recommendations about current films since I stopped using film years ago and most of the ones I used are no longer available. I used slide film primarily and my favourites were Kodachrome 25 and Fujichrome RFP 50.
 

alexfairkon

MobiAddict
Real Name
Alex
Device
Android (Generic)
[QUOTE = "FundyBrian, post: 403165, member: 4126"] [/QUOTE]
Вы абсолютно правы! Фильм не лучший выбор для зимы.
I’ve a photography aficionado and have recently ventured into film photography. I’m using the Canon AE-1 camera, which I’m planning to take with me on my Ukraine ski trip. Any advice on what type of film I should get? I’m going to buy the film online, so there won’t be a problem with its availability. I appreciate any photography tips for shooting outdoors in a winter setting as well!
If I went to Ukraine, I would try to buy there a black and white negative film “Svema PHOTO-65 or PHOTO-64 or technical film KN1, KN2” and chemicals for the development of the Lviv Khimreaktiv plant. These things were made on the territory of Ukraine before the collapse of the USSR, about 30 years ago. But it still works, even if it looks soaked. D76 from Lviv is just magical!
 

alexfairkon

MobiAddict
Real Name
Alex
Device
Android (Generic)
LOL.:lol:

Although many of us here started out in the film photography arena, MobiTog is a mobile photography community. All images here are made and edited on mobile devices, i.e. phones, tablets, iPods.

I know there are members here who can still give good photography tips for shooting outdoors in the winter, and perhaps your interest might be piqued enough to give it a go with your own mobile device.

Feel free to have a look around in our different forums to see the amazing work people create with their mobile device.
I see two main problems 1) Winter, low light, short day. and 2) low temperatures, condensation and poorly performing batteries. In such circumstances, SMARTPHONE (Good, with a large battery) has an absolute advantage. I'm just sorry for Lomography fans and owners of iPhones = (
 

alexfairkon

MobiAddict
Real Name
Alex
Device
Android (Generic)
The issue you raised about the accessory camera attachments as made by Sony, Olympus, and a couple of others, is a tricky problem. I’m quite interested in those devices as well. Basically they are self-contained cameras that simply use the iPhone as a viewer while the actual image is recorded using the larger sensor on the external device. It is the larger sensor that gives them the better image quality. I would say that in order for the pictures to be considered acceptable on MobiTog the original image needs to be captured on the internal camera sensor in the mobile device (iPhone, smartphone, iPod, iPad) and not on an external device. Attaching accessory lenses to the built-in camera is OK but recording images on an external sensor is not. I can use my iPhone as a remote viewer/controller for several different cameras but they all capture the image on the external device sensor and not directly on the iPhone sensor so that’s not allowed. This means that capturing the image on an external device and simultaneously sending it to your phone by wifi or Bluetooth and not even saving it on the external device is still not allowed. The key point is capturing the image directly on the built-in camera sensor on the phone.
I am interested in exactly cheap cameras and the control of their functions through WIFI. Many animals are very careful, you can get the best result if you leave the camera (or several cameras) and hide yourself. I have not found the ability to control the smartphone in this way.
 
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FundyBrian

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Brian Townsend
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iPhone 8 Plus
My 365
My MobiTog 365
I am interested in exactly cheap cameras and the control of their functions through WIFI. Many animals are very careful, you can get the best result if you leave the camera (or several cameras) and hide yourself. I have not found the ability to control the smartphone in this way.
Yes, me, too. The lack of a long telephoto on the iPhone has caused me to explore other ways to try to get good photos of animals and birds. One is to use another iDevice such as anothe phone, iPod or iPad to remotely control the primary iPhone. I find no matter which camera I use there is too much lag time using wifi or Bluetooth. Especially with birds. I see the shot I want and by the time the shutter actually fires too much time has passed and the moment has gone. It is true that the newer devices lave a bit less lag time. Controlling a GoPro or any other camera has the same lag time.

You might be interested to try some of the action apps like Flow Shot or Motion Sensor. These were primarily designed to capture action of something passing by on a predetermined route, such as a mountain biker on a trail, snow boarder, etc. They can be set up to make single images, to start making images, or record video, when the camera detects motion in the scene. You can also set it to keep recording until motion is no longer detected, then it stops and waits for the next action cycle. I used them with some success to photograph hummingbirds when it got too tiresome to sit there for a long time waiting for them to adjust to my presence and come back. The motion sensing aspect works fairly well as long as the light is good enough. The only drawback I found was the cameras have minimal control to override exposure, in cases where the background is dark for instance.
 

alexfairkon

MobiAddict
Real Name
Alex
Device
Android (Generic)
Yes, me, too. The lack of a long telephoto on the iPhone has caused me to explore other ways to try to get good photos of animals and birds. One is to use another iDevice such as anothe phone, iPod or iPad to remotely control the primary iPhone. I find no matter which camera I use there is too much lag time using wifi or Bluetooth. Especially with birds. I see the shot I want and by the time the shutter actually fires too much time has passed and the moment has gone. It is true that the newer devices lave a bit less lag time.Controlling a GoPro or any other camera has the same lag time.

You might be interested to try some of the action apps like Flow Shot or Motion Sensor. These were primarily designed to capture action of something passing by on a predetermined route, such as a mountain biker on a trail, snow boarder, etc. They can be set up to make single images, to start making images, or record video, when the camera detects motion in the scene. You can also set it to keep recording until motion is no longer detected, then it stops and waits for the next action cycle.I used them with some success to photograph hummingbirds when it got too tiresome to sit there for a long time waiting for them to adjust to my presence and come back. The motion sensing aspect works fairly well as long as the light is good enough. The only drawback I found was the cameras have minimal control to override exposure, in cases where the background is dark for instance.
These programs are designed to ios! I do not use iPhone ! Motion detectors for android are terrible. A bunch of purulent ads, etc.!
 

FundyBrian

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Brian Townsend
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iPhone 8 Plus
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These programs are designed to ios! I do not use iPhone ! Motion detectors for android are terrible. A bunch of purulent ads, etc.!
Ah, sorry. I failed to take note you were using Android.
Have you ever tried taking pictures through a telescope? I detailed my experiments doing that in the accessories section a while back. Since that time there are mounts available to attach and align a phone to a telescope or binoculars. I was using a telephoto lens from a film camera with a telescope adapter. It worked fairly well but there is a lot of light loss so you need good light to keep the ISO high enough so there isn’t excessive digital noise in the image. I suspect you can get better results using a camera lens (telephoto) than a viewing lens (telescope) since photo resolution needs to be higher. With a telephoto camera lens you need the telescope eyepiece adapter in order for it to work.

Have you ever tried a remote shutter release with your phone? I have a small Bluetooth gizmo that allows me to trip the phone shutter from a distance. It is made mostly for things like group photos where you want to be included in the shot. Under good conditions you can get about 30 feet distance. Obviously you can no longer see what the camera sees so your camera needs to be set up with the framing you want so you are just waiting for the subject to get in position. On iPhone the remote shutter only works with camera apps that can be triggered by pressing the volume button so there are some apps it won’t work with.
 

alexfairkon

MobiAddict
Real Name
Alex
Device
Android (Generic)
Ah, sorry. I failed to take note you were using Android.
Have you ever tried taking pictures through a telescope? I detailed my experiments doing that in the accessories section a while back. Since that time there are mounts available to attach and align a phone to a telescope or binoculars. I was using a telephoto lens from a film camera with a telescope adapter. It worked fairly well but there is a lot of light loss so you need good light to keep the ISO high enough so there isn’t excessive digital noise in the image. I suspect you can get better results using a camera lens (telephoto) than a viewing lens (telescope) since photo resolution needs to be higher. With a telephoto camera lens you need the telescope eyepiece adapter in order for it to work.

Have you ever tried a remote shutter release with your phone? I have a small Bluetooth gizmo that allows me to trip the phone shutter from a distance. It is made mostly for things like group photos where you want to be included in the shot. Under good conditions you can get about 30 feet distance. Obviously you can no longer see what the camera sees so your camera needs to be set up with the framing you want so you are just waiting for the subject to get in position. On iPhone the remote shutter only works with camera apps that can be triggered by pressing the volume button so there are some apps it won’t work with.
Yes, I tried to combine the smartphone and the rare LOMO telescope of the Maksutov-Kassegren System. I also used a massive laboratory tripod made of steel and cast iron with a weight of about 18 kg. In normal set my smartphone has a wired headset with one button that works with the standard camera app. This bundle allows you to photograph the rings on Saturn.
 
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